Refrigerator Magnets 013 The Joy in Mudville

[Hats] Baseball Cap

“…And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go, …”

from Casey at the Bat, by Ernest Lawrence Thayer – 1863-1940


The Joy in Mudville

The joy in Mudville was not wholly ground in dust that day,
For cellebration on the mound rewards the victors’ play;
And while each Mudville fan did sigh and bow his head,
A mighty whooping dogpile crushed the pitcher without dread.

They raised him up upon their shoulders high for his campaign,
and brought him to the lockers as they doused him with Champagne.
They set him soaking back to Earth, still grinning victory,
And raised a boisterous chorus shouting, “Phinney! Phinney! Phinney!” [1]

[fourteener/ballad] by Paul Guernsey


In honor of “Casey at the Bat”, by Ernest Lawrence Thayer – 1863-1940

[1] “The poem was originally published anonymously (under the pen name “Phin”, based on Thayer’s college nickname, “Phinney”).[2]”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casey_at_the_Bat
[2] Gardner, Martin (October 1967). “Casey At The Bat”. American Heritage. 18 (6). Retrieved 20 October 2012.

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Don’t Know Where it is I’m Going

Don’t know where it is I’m going;
Not sure I really care.
Can’t trace back all the paths I took;
My shoes in disrepair.

Oh, take me there, just take me, please.
It’s been so many days.
I haven’t seen my countrymen
nor heard their music play.

I crossed a bridge a mile back,
What river couldn’t say,
And saw a sign for Heaven.
Perhaps you know the way?

Oh, take me there, just take me, please.
It’s been so many days.
I haven’t seen my countrymen
nor heard their music play.

Ballad* by Paul Guernsey Player, © 2018/07/19

in response to New roads by Lize Bard @Haiku Out Of Africa


*ballad – [quora.com] A ballad is a long poem in short stanzas that tells a story. They can be humorous, romantic, or adventurous. They usually have a simple rhyme scheme, like couplets or abcb. In the English tradition, they are four line stanzas with alternating 4 and 3 beat lines … and can be set to music. – Holly Harwood [origin: The ballad derives its name from medieval French dance songs or “ballares”, from which ‘ballet’ is also derived (L: ballare, to dance) – Harvard Dictionary of Music (Harvard, 1944; 2nd edn., 1972), p. 70. ]

Ballads were originally written to accompany dances, and so were composed in couplets with refrains in alternate lines. These refrains would have been sung by the dancers in time with the dance. [“Popular Ballads”, The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, p. 610. ] – Wikipedia.org